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#7735 |

Well, like I said, each person’s machine on here is a little different and even if they were all identical we all have different endmills/bits and different materials.

What you can do is take a piece of scrap and design a test. Set up a basic shape or even just some lines and on each line change one setting. Either feed rate or depth per pass. As the depth per pass goes up, the feed rate should probably go down. After doing a series of lines (or after each line if you are really dedicated) observe what worked and what didn’t and move on based on that. Going too slow or too fast may cause excess heat that may burn the wood a little bit. The settings will be different for every type of material that you want to mill, though among similar materials (such as soft woods) the settings can stay the same. With things like circles or even just angled lines you have to think about the side load on the bit. It is being pushed in two directions at the same time. One could argue that doesn’t matter because the surface area being cut is the same, but I think it might make a slight difference, especially if the tool is very low rpm (not an issue with the DW660).

If you are using estlcam, you can play around with this too if you don’t mind loosing more material to waste.