Brushless foam cutter

This topic contains 6 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  karltinsly 1 year, 8 months ago.

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  • #5153

    karltinsly
    Participant

    I found this really interesting design on thingiverse for a foam cutter that uses a very fast reciprocating needle to cut dollar tree foam board (and probably some other things as well). The design was by dkj4linux. I took his design and modified it to fit in my DW660 mount. Attached are a couple of pictures of it so far. I still need to attach the cutting wire to the bearing on the flywheel, and balance it so that it doesn’t shake itself apart at 10,000 RPM.

    Check out the design, details, and video of the cutter in action here: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1211039.

    Thanks dkj4linux for sharing your design – can’t wait to get mine going!

    #5156

    dkj4linux
    Participant

    Thanks, Karl, for starting this thread. I love your adapter… it’ll be so much simpler to add/remove to the MPCNC. You gonna put it out on Thingiverse?

    #5157

    karltinsly
    Participant

    I’ll definitely put it up on thingiverse once I get it all hooked up and running, just to make sure there are no problems.

    #5162

    dkj4linux
    Participant

    Blue-cor, $tree foam board, and the cardboard box it came in… I’ve even tried Coroplast but with very limited success (it’s very tough on needles but I wasn’t turning as many RPM’s then and had to do a lot of Xacto work… maybe a multipass approach is in order?)

    #5245

    dkj4linux
    Participant

    Something to consider… the inflation needle guide can get pretty hot when the foam cutter is run at high speed (8000-10000 rpm?) for the time it takes to cut a sheet of foam board. If it gets hot enough it will soften the guide needle “threads” in the PLA and allow the needle point to drift away from where it should be.

    To be honest, I normally run with no lubrication at all on the needle or in the guide. The high-quality spring steel of the music-wire needle and the brass(?) guide needle seem suited to the task, especially at lower rpms. At any rate, I consider the needle a “consumable” as it is easily fabricated and replaced. Though I’ve not had a music-wire needle work-harden and break to date, I have had a needle guide start “wallowing” in its plastic threads. It could be that a proper lubricant would help…but everything I’ve tried so far — light machine oil, vaseline — either blackened and crusted up and/or migrated down the needle and stained the work piece. Possibly white lithium grease or other non-migrating lube might be a better choice?

    A better approach IMO is to “heat sink” the guide needle and spread/lessen the heat build-up so that it doesn’t soften the PLA plastic. Two approaches I’ve considered so far…

    1) a 8mm BW tube motor mount can be mounted directly under the 5/16″ hole through the foam cutter platform and the guide needle then simply mounted in the motor mount with setscrews… or better (if you have a metal lathe and suitable tiny drill bits),

    2) a 5/16″ x 2″ carriage bolt can be bored through its center — very similar to a 3d printer nozzle. I start with a 0.040″-0.050″ hole bored through the head for a depth of 1/2″ or so, then flip the bolt end-for-end and center-drill to form a conical opening, followed by a 3/16″ bore through the center of the bolt, to finally meet the “nozzle” hole bored through the bolt head.

    I recognize the carriage bolt approach is not something many are likely to take on but I suspect a “poor man’s approach” to accomplishing a similar result is to simply purchase a real all-metal 3d printer hot-end and enlarge the nozzle opening to 0.040″ or so (~1 mm).

    #5592

    dkj4linux
    Participant

    Here’s where I am with my current foam cutter. I’ve incorporated Karl’s foam cutter mount for HicWic’s MPCNC universal mounting system and Thurmond Moore’s MIG-tip needle guide. I used a spare flywheel, bored out to 1/4″ to make a needle guide holder that allows adjustment for varying material thickness, up to the full stroke length.

    #5600

    karltinsly
    Participant

    Looking great, David! Very ingenious way of having an adjustable cutting depth!

    I was just getting ready to modify my cutter mount to accommodate the welder bit, but now I think I’ll follow your lead and just print another flywheel.

    Karl

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