China Spindle Wiring.

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Chuck Pickering 3 weeks, 2 days ago.

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  • #48120

    Teo Nordström
    Participant

    Hello. I have just built a MPCNC and it is working like a charm! I have only been pen plotting thus far, but now I want to get into the heavier stuff, milling. I got this China spindle from a website, and I’d like to use it. The problem is that I have no experience at all with wiring, and this thing came without instructions. I was wondering if anyone here could guide me on what to solder where? Thanks! Pics: 

    #48122

    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    I hope you have a certain tolerance for risk… No datasheet and people helping on the Internet will end up with a non-zero failure rate :).

    Here are some guesses I’d make:

    a) There are only two connectors on the motor, right? I’m guessing that you wire one to one of the V+ and one to one of the V-, and if it’s wrong, then the motor will rotate in the opposite direction. Are there any stickers on the motor that would indicate that 48V is right and 7.5A is enough? Are there any stickers that indicate which is + and which is -?

    b) You wire your house A/C into the three jacks on the right of the power supply. The circle with the lines in it is ground, the N is Neutral and the L is Live. There’s probably a switch somewhere to change between 110VAC and 230VAC. Look for that before you try to turn it on. I would also either wire in a switch, or connect it to a power strip with a switch, so you could turn it off if something isn’t right. Unplugging things under pressure can be tricky.

    c) You shouldn’t do any soldering, and you should get some sort of beefy cables, somewhere in the 16-12 gauge. On the power supply side, you can just screw the wires down. On the motor side, I have a collection of these “spade” style crimp connectors, and I would find one that fit. If I didn’t have those, I would go into an AutoZone or O’Reilly auto parts and find one that fits. Something like these (but the right size):
    https://www.amazon.com/Yueton-100pcs-Insulated-Terminal-Connectors/dp/B010GWZOUW

    d) I’d leave that potentiometer installed until it’s working. After a while, you could try to tell which pin is the signal, and what it’s highest value is, and possibly control the speed and on/off from Marlin. If it’s like a lot of similar looking ones, then it’s 0-10V, and you’ll need some more circuitry to get past 50% speed (since the arduino is 0-5V).

    #48125

    Derek P
    Participant

    Well done Jeff, I think this is good advice and very well written.

    A couple of extra points, there are 3 positive DC terminals, only one of these needs to be connected and this applies to the negative DC terminals as well. On the potentiometer, the middle terminal is the wiper and is likely to be the signal pin.

    #48128

    Teo Nordström
    Participant
    I hope you have a certain tolerance for risk… No datasheet and people helping on the Internet will end up with a non-zero failure rate :). Here are some guesses I’d make: a) There are only two connectors on the motor, right? I’m guessing that you wire one to one of the V+ and one to one of the V-, and if it’s wrong, then the motor will rotate in the opposite direction. Are there any stickers on the motor that would indicate that 48V is right and 7.5A is enough? Are there any stickers that indicate which is + and which is -? b) You wire your house A/C into the three jacks on the right of the power supply. The circle with the lines in it is ground, the N is Neutral and the L is Live. There’s probably a switch somewhere to change between 110VAC and 230VAC. Look for that before you try to turn it on. I would also either wire in a switch, or connect it to a power strip with a switch, so you could turn it off if something isn’t right. Unplugging things under pressure can be tricky. c) You shouldn’t do any soldering, and you should get some sort of beefy cables, somewhere in the 16-12 gauge. On the power supply side, you can just screw the wires down. On the motor side, I have a collection of these “spade” style crimp connectors, and I would find one that fit. If I didn’t have those, I would go into an AutoZone or O’Reilly auto parts and find one that fits. Something like these (but the right size): https://www.amazon.com/Yueton-100pcs-Insulated-Terminal-Connectors/dp/B010GWZOUW d) I’d leave that potentiometer installed until it’s working. After a while, you could try to tell which pin is the signal, and what it’s highest value is, and possibly control the speed and on/off from Marlin. If it’s like a lot of similar looking ones, then it’s 0-10V, and you’ll need some more circuitry to get past 50% speed (since the arduino is 0-5V).

    Thanks a lot! This was great info and I am definentaly going do as you said, I have no other choice but I Think it will go fine 🙂 The thing was only 30 bucks, so it isn’t a huge loss if something breaks (It was originally 120 bucks but through an “exploit” you could get a 75% coupon code). If something breaks, I’ll try and get my hands on one of those DW660’s, but they are quite hard to come by as I live in Sweden. Also, I bought them in a pack (the spindle came with the PSU) so the 48V and 7.5A should work just fine. Thanks again!

    #48148

    Chuck Pickering
    Participant

    I ordered my spindle(HXKJ-GS52-400w) way before I started building my MPCNC, which I’m just starting to assemble. I was short on cash when I ordered it and didn’t order a power supply for it.

    I need a supply exactly like you show, would you mind sharing who you bought it from?

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