Making a gate

This topic contains 21 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Barry Barry 1 month, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #33630
    Profile photo of Mike
    Mike
    Participant

    I’m making a gate on my CNC mill. There’s a video of the progress here:

    There will be 3 sections, the top section is horizontal panels, the second section is wooden poles, and third section is vertical panels.

    The CNC has been great for making the joints and the slots to rest the panels.

    If I were to start again I’d probably resize the machine to be able to cut a full length plank of wood because having to turn the wood and make sure it all lines up perfectly has been a bit of a pain.

    I’ll post photos and video when I’ve made more progress

    #33633
    Profile photo of Jeffeb3
    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    Haha. That intense music and then the sleeping dog… Hilarious.

    And, this is a neat project. Who needs a pantarouter to make mortise and tenons? This is just great. I keep thinking I’d need to stand the board on its end to do joint details, but cutting a cheek at a time is a great idea. I’d love to see some more details walking through the cut setups and joinery, if you’re willing.

    Also, that is a nice big bit. Is that 1/2″? What settings are you running that with?

    #33666

    Wow. That’s a lot of work, impressive!

    I still think that making mortises and tenons is waaaaayyy faster with the good old wood chisel and hand saw/table saw/router, but it may be more accurate this way.
    It may also be easier to just move the gantry by hand axis per axis to do these cuts, instead of making all the gcode instructions and let the machine do the work. That’s probably how I would have done it if I were you.

    Good job, keep us posted when finished 🙂

    #33670
    Profile photo of Ryan
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    That was awesome, the music made it seem so fun. Crank that thing up you can go faster!

    #33678
    Profile photo of Mike
    Mike
    Participant
    I still think that making mortises and tenons is waaaaayyy faster with the good old wood chisel and hand saw/table saw/router, but it may be more accurate this way.
    It may also be easier to just move the gantry by hand axis per axis to do these cuts, instead of making all the gcode instructions and let the machine do the work. That’s probably how I would have done it if I were you.

    Heh, fortunately I had the whole gate designed in Fusion360 anyway, so exporting the paths to the CNC was nice and fast. I’m also rubbish with a chisel!!

    Also, that is a nice big bit. Is that 1/2″? What settings are you running that with?

    It’s 8mm flat, so around 1/3rd of an inch. I’ve been running it super slow because I unfortunately chipped the tip of the bit over the weekend and it’s causing a lot of smoke! I’ll post details of my optimal settings once my replacements arrive on Tuesday.

    I’ve also just ordered one of these: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B004WO62UM/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I’ve not tried using one of these big router bits before, but hoping it’ll allow me to clear bulk material faster.

    #33768
    Profile photo of Mike
    Mike
    Participant

    Quick update

    The top section is starting to take shape:

    Looking forward to getting back onto the rest when I get back from Paris on Saturday.

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #33914
    Profile photo of Bill
    Bill
    Participant

    Last time I used a chisel I verified that bone is flexible, yet solid enough to work well at stopping a sharp edge, where skin and flesh are not. 😉

    #33927
    Profile photo of Barry
    Barry
    Participant
    Last time I used a chisel I verified that bone is flexible, yet solid enough to work well at stopping a sharp edge, where skin and flesh are not. ?

    Ouch!

    #33939
    Last time I used a chisel I verified that bone is flexible, yet solid enough to work well at stopping a sharp edge, where skin and flesh are not. ?

    That sounds like a weird idea.
    Please don’t try to verify anything using the circular saw!!

    2 users thanked author for this post.
    #33940
    Profile photo of David Walling
    David Walling
    Participant

    I’ve never tested anything with a chisel, but I have left hand knowledge that a drill bit is hot after boring a hole in concrete…

    It was dusty so I thought I’d wipe it off…

    #33975
    Profile photo of Bill
    Bill
    Participant

    On the other hand the scar is nice and straight…

    #33980
    Profile photo of Barry
    Barry
    Participant

    Heh, I caught a leather glove on fire once. I have a propane forge in my barn’s basement, thought the metal was cool, I was wrong! Wasn’t glowing anyway…. Glad I was wearing gloves!

    #34701
    Profile photo of Mike
    Mike
    Participant

    Well, it took a while but I got there in the end. Here’s the finished product:

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #34708
    Profile photo of Jeffeb3
    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    That looks like a lot of fun. Designing it, and figuring out how to set up the cuts, going through all the CAM. That must have been pretty exciting to see it finished. If that was made from some fine hard wood, it could be legitimate furniture, like a headboard. Congrats!

    #34717
    Profile photo of Ryan
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    Nice work, and that dowel test fit look pretty spot on, seems like you might be a pro at this already!

    #34735
    Profile photo of Mike
    Mike
    Participant

    Emergency Stop -> Increased the dimension of the holes by 0.3mm in fusion360 -> restart

    😉

    #34739
    Profile photo of Ryan
    Ryan
    Keymaster

    See that a pro move right there, no one gets it right the first time but the ability to adapt…That’s Pro.

    #34745
    Profile photo of Jeffeb3
    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    I’ve heard it said before that the difference between a novice and an expert woodworker is how well they cover their mistakes.

    #34937
    Profile photo of Psycho Stimpy
    Psycho Stimpy
    Participant

    That is a great project. I do this type of work on my routing table but this is definitely a creative approach. One thing that came to mind when seeing this is possibly setting up a jig to mount them upright under the cutting head. This would require removing the scrap board and/or creating a hole to do them. I could picture lining up a handful of tenons at once and having them all completed without the need to turn them. That would be interesting to try. Biggest problem would be dealing with the tool depth supporting the depth of the cut. Has to be long enough to not drive the gantry into the piece.

    Very impressive work! Congratulations on your final product.

    #34962
    Profile photo of Mike
    Mike
    Participant

    Standing planks on-end would be fantastic. I noticed that the YouTuber Frank Howarth has a similar setup on his CNC table (although, it’s not very tall).

    As far as depth of cut goes, I’ve not yet made a cut deeper than 50mm-60mm (2 – 2.3 inches), but I imagine that’d be good enough in most cases.

    #35000
    Profile photo of Jeffeb3
    Jeffeb3
    Participant

    I have plans to have the end of my low rider be for the ends on boards. I haven’t come up with a good, flat, square way to do it yet. Frank’s CNC made me want to do it. I should just make something. Perfect is the enemy of good…

    On a side note, how upsetting was it when he got rid of his, and went with the big commercial one?

    #35001
    Profile photo of Barry
    Barry
    Participant
    I have plans to have the end of my low rider be for the ends on boards. I haven’t come up with a good, flat, square way to do it yet. Frank’s CNC made me want to do it. I should just make something. Perfect is the enemy of good…

    On a side note, how upsetting was it when he got rid of his, and went with the big commercial one?

    If I could get the same deal he did, I’d do it!

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